Welcome to NEXT.

Why new music? It’s important. And it’s good for you.

May NEXT find a song that makes your ears smile. Enjoy it all.

“Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.”– Berthold Auerbach

Music is Life. 

There’s an excitement that comes from listening to a new song. I love when a new song hits me in the heart or head or ears – and I want everyone to hear it. One reason I have a radio show. When I play a song I want it cementing itself into your life and identity. I want to find you a NEXT, new favorite song. I want that emotional responsive. I want your ears smiling.

And yet at some point, the taste for new music dwindles for most, eventually reaching a “paralysis” point in our late 20s or early 30s.

In 2018, the French streaming service Deezer surveyed 5,000 people. They found that people stopped seeking out new music right around their 28th birthdays. The reasons? Most said saying they were too busy to find new music, or too overwhelmed by all the new releases. 

If only there was a weekly one hour radio show that solved both those problems. 

Spotify has also found people reach that “paralysis point” in their 30s.

Should you get rid of that 10-year-old driving playlist? No. Should you time a bit of time and find something new and create another playlist? Yes. An active interest in music can be beneficial to our brains as we get older

New music makes you feel good. Want to feel good? Try new music.

When we feel great emotions – chemicals rush to our brains which causes us to feel pleasure, and sometimes pain. We get older and enter adulthood, the routine of life can become void of those emotions. We go round and round. Where are the “Great Emotions” when we do the same job day in and day out?

Valorie Salimpoor, author of “The Brain and New Music”, says our drive to experience strong emotions is why we like art and music. “People usually lead fairly routine lives and they don’t get the chance to experience intense emotions that are almost cathartic to us,” Salimpoor said. “As we age we lose opportunities to experience that.”

When we listen to genres of music we like, pleasure centers in our brains connected to strong emotions light up. That feels good. Some of the most powerful chemicals in the brain can be released when listening to music. People can experience intense pleasure in response to playing or listening to music.

The good brain chemicals can be even more powerful when we listen to new music. How? When we hear a new song for the first time. We anticipate what may come next. Salimpoor continues, “As long as a new song adheres to certain patterns our brain is familiar with, its newness can give an added boost.” Think about when you listen to NEXT. Your favorite new songs are the ones that remind you of an old favorites. It’s new. Exciting. And old. And familiar. Safe and stimulating. That’s a strong combination, no?

The pleasure of listening to new music can even help with mental illnesses like depression, especially when it’s enjoyed in a group setting. And that’s from Cesar Quililan, a physician at MetroHealth in Orlando. I did the google.

I’ve said it before and will say it again. Live music is good for your soul. There’s something about celebrating as a group. Together. Yet the experience is just for the individual as well. Listening to music in a group setting adds a social aspect. Feelings of isolation can dissipate. The end result is a happier, more content life. Music is Life. Music can bring joy to people’s lives. Music makes you feel good.

Build new pathways in your brain

The genres of music we grew up with are what we will stick with through most of our lives. It’s our musical identifier. AND when you take a small leap into a new genre – it can be good for you.

One way is building new pathways in our brains. WHAT? Yes – Listening to NEXT works on many different levels inside your brain. When we are young – our brain is like sponge. We soak up all the music we hear. And this is important – storing it in templates. We organize all the music we’ve ever listened. Why? So we can recognize other songs and patterns more easily. It’s crazy cool and done instantly and without conscious thought or decision.

“Whatever music you listen to will establish the patterns that are stored in your brain,” Salimpoor said. “In order for your brain to make predictions, you have to be somewhat familiar to the music you’re listening to.” That’s why going from classical music to death metal might not happen on the first listen. The key here is listening to genres adjacent to the ones you already like.

With every new style you listen to, your brain is staying active, storing the sounds for later recognition. New music keeps you young at heart. And mind.

Your brain yearns for anticipation

You play a song over and over. Your brain gets bored. Not bored – just not challenged. Your brain thinks “I know this song – I know how it goes.” Plus, your brain isn’t giving you the same rewards it used to. You got a rush before. Now – not so much. New music to the rescue.

Christopher Bergland wrote “The Athlete’s Way: Training Your Mind and Body to Experience the Joy of Exercise.” He writes about the lottery effect. It’s when unpredictability leads to reward. Sensing a trend? New music leads to your brain getting a reward. So listen to NEXT and treat your brain. Give your brain what it craves.

The unpredictability of a new a song. Or hitting random on a current playlist – can provide a boost in dopamine. Not knowing what to expect gives our brains a higher sense of anticipation. When a new song comes on that isn’t anticipated, we get an added boost of feel-good chemicals, enjoying the release following the unknown. Add a NEXT song to your current favorites. So your brain a favor. Enjoy the dopamine hit.

Random is good for athletes and random can also help with everyday stresses. At work – try to mix it up. Heading home – take a different route. At home – go for a walk. Cook a new meal. Or order out if you always cook. So for a needed boost with your music may I suggest listening to NEXT. And if you find a NEXT favorite song add it to a current playlist. Then press that shuffle button . And sit back. Wait on the edge of your seat for what’s next. You might be guessing what’s NEXT. You’ll be surprised. Enjoy the dopamine hit. You’re welcome. 

It’s easy to find cool new songs today 

There is more new music today than ever. The amount of new music released daily is staggering. There are a lot of  places to “get back into the new music game”. NEXT is just one of many great places for great new music discovery. 

New music playlists are easy to find. Now every song may not invoke that deep neural pleasure. There are bound to be some diamonds in the rough. That’s why the goal is to find a NEXT, new favorite song every week. Maybe you listen and find a handful. Quite sure when you listen you’ll find at least one song. That one new song. Also may I add the old adage it’s the journey not the destination. 

Welcome to your new music journey may your final destination be a NEXT, new favorite song.

Thank you for listening. Thank you for reading. Thoughts?


Spotify playlist updates on Thursday(ish). Link to Chris Bro on Spotify.

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WARNING may contain bad words. Or may not. Depends.


You can listen to NEXT on the radio. Listen to NEXT on Ocean 98 in Maryland Sunday nights at 10. Or Saturday afternoon on VOBB in Canada

Artist and Song Title:

  • Lucero – Have You Lost Your Way?
  • Haunted Shed – Old Joy
  • Typhoon – Empire Builder
  • The Backseat Lovers – Kilby Girl
  • Friedberg – Lizzy
  • Big Mother Gig – The Underdog
  • Foo Fighters – Cloudspotter
  • Yester Daze – Backseat Bingo
  • Hayley Williams – Good Grief
  • Julien Baker – Favor
  • Chet Faker – Low
  • Hearty Har – Don’t Go Looking For Me
  • Briston Maroney – It’s Still Cool If You Don’t
  • Thad Cockrell – Swingin’
  • Kaleo – Break My Baby

and remember if you love someone hug them right now

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