Time for a contest. I want a music story. The best one (as voted by the writers of this blog) wins a box full of CDs. A plethora if you will.

I want a true story that involves music somehow. It could the best concert you ever saw. It could be the story of you getting to a concert (or not getting to a concert). Buying your first LP. The song that was playing while you met your future husband and/or wife. I think you get the idea. Give your best music story and I’ll give you a bunch of free CDs.

Only comments on this site (not Facebook etc) will be judged.

15 Comments

  • four or five months ago my friends and i were on our way to terminal five to see julian casablancas, we were blazing a j on the way there. undercover cop comes outta no where and arrests us. we get handcuffed and thrown in a van, ended up getting arrested with a bunch of guys my age we spent five hours in jail while they checked our records. Missed a show but made five new friends who have similar music tastes, oh yeah and we watched one kid cry and then try and get out of the car by rapping for the cops. all in all i did some hard time and had the time of my life. haha.

  • Well, I founded an indie record label, ProGenitor Entertainment, in 2009. My first order of business was launching the music career of my sister, Faryn Sand, a singer-songwriter in NYC. Since we were starting literally from the ground up, I decided to reach out on Twitter to a few musicians I admired, and whose careers I had supported over the years. I just asked if they would take a few minutes to visit my sister’s Web site and give their opinion on her music. I only got one reply. It was from the former lead singer of a partially famous early- to mid-90’s band. This person’s response: “I haven’t listened to the tunes, but my first piece of advice to your sister would be to fire you as her manager.” Nice to see people can communicate so much in 140 characters or less!

  • About 5 + years ago, I went to Bryant Park with my friend Carley for a free concert starring John Mayer with Dido opening & someone before her. We didn’t have a pass from the sponsor to sit on the grass so we were at a table on the opposite side of the stage. I brought a trash bag in lieu of a poncho because thunderstorms were predicted. It poured like an SOB, Dido was drenched, you could see thru her blouse & I was a wreck because I just wanted to see JM for the 1st time. Before he could appear on stage, the electricity blew out the equipment or something & JM came on stage with his acoustic guitar & played til management dragged him off the stage. Carley & I rushed up to the stage & I watched my dear JM in the pouring rain dressed in a black trash bag. The beginning!

  • It was the second time in the same weekend seeing U2, Joshua Tree tour – saw them Friday night at Nassua Col. and Monday night at Giants Stadium. The Giants Stadium show was general admission. Got there at 11 am and “tailgated” on line until the gates opened at 6 pm, when everyone rushed the gates to get in. Got a great spot, 30 ft from the stage. Opening act goes on at 8. It’s Steven van Zant and he freaking plays for an hour and a half! Holy crap, we’d been there since 11 waiting and he plays for 90 minutes!! For fear of losing our spots, none of us left to get something to drink, use the bathroom, nothing for the 90 min and U2’s performance. By the time the concert was over we were spent – no voice and dehyrdated. Went back to the car and downed a bottle of beer so fast it went to my head (my wife just said, hopefully you weren’t driving. Um sure let’s just say I wasn’t.). Concert was amazing, no sets, no videos, no pyro, just U2 and their amps.

  • Not a real exciting story, more sentimental. I first started getting into Rusted Root in ’95; that summer, Send Me on My Way was really big. I met my husband in May ’95 – he was living in NY, I was in RI; we’d either hear the song together or I was listening to the cassette (ha cassette!) in my car as I drove to NY to visit. So whenever I hear RR, they remind me of those first summer months together. I’m so happy to have seen them live, finally!, at the P’ville Music Festival, 15 years after that first summer. (Awww…)

  • Pearl Jam 10/8/00 – East Troy, Wisconsin, hard to believe it has been almost 10 years now. “Welcome to the ice bowl. If anyone can handle it, it’s you.” was how it began. To date the coldest show the band has ever played. At show time it was in the mid 20’s and the entire band came out in jackets and you could see Eddie’s breath as he sang. I was in a light jacket on the lawn, ill-prepared for such weather. Copious amounts of alcohol were consumed and served me well that night. Although it was not the longest set the band has ever played, it was a great setlist and was a very memorable night.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BzMMHlv_dy8&feature=fvw

  • Back in 2000 I went to Providence to catch an MTV sponsored show where Moby (who we had come to see) opened for Bush. As my friends and I stood amongst the teenbopper crowd and tried to avoid elbowing them in the head, I got to see Moby for the first time. The Play album was practically my soundtrack for my first semester in college.
    Not interested in seeing Mr. Stefani (though he prob was not that at the time), my friends and I dashed out to meet Moby and get a picture with him (I packed my digital camera!).
    We were so happy to chat with him and he signed some of our stuff. What a great night.
    And I’ve been fortunate to say hi to him a few times since then, always just as eager!

  • David I feel for you. I went to school in Wisconsin and it’s cold and snowy there. In fact, one year spring break was “late” because we were snowed in.

  • I was fortunate enough to catch Coldplay recording ‘Storytellers’ out at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. On the way home, I figured out Dave Matthews Band was recording the next night at what I assumed would be the same venue.

    So I decide to cruise out to Brooklyn, with no ticket, confirmed time, etc, and scope it out. On the way out of the office, I grab a marker and a piece of cardboard and make a sign that says ‘Whose Friend is stuck at work? I’d love to go!’

    When I start walking to the venue (at the same time as the night before when we were standing in line) there is no one in front of the building. I walk around the entire building to try and see what might be going on. Find some ‘Dave Matthews Band’ equipment trunks sitting on a truck around back so I know it’s on.

    I go up to the front door, walk in and just try my luck at getting in. At the same time, a guy with a cowboy hat walks in and goes up to security right behind me.

    After I get through security, I get to a guy with a stack of tickets at the door and I can hear the band playing. The guy asks if I’m on the list and I say no. I ask what he’s going to do with all of the unclaimed tickets and he said ‘turn them back in to the record company’ and then turns me away. What a waste! So I head back outside and try and plan out the next move.

    At the same time, the guy with the cowboy hat has been turned away at security because he’s carrying a pretty sizable hunting knife in his pocket. He has stepped outside to call his car service to come back and pick up the knife so that he can get into the show. While he is waiting for this car to come around, he sees my sign and asks me what it says. I tell him that I’m trying to find a ticket for the show. He also asks me if I’m in the industry/what do I do? And I respond with the lamest answer about what I do making my job sound so lame. Anyways, I ask him what he does and he says he is a musician and then he goes back inside saying ‘Good luck getting in.’

    3 minutes later, a bouncer comes out and asks me if I’m looking for a ticket. I say yes and thank him. He says ‘thank the guy in the cowboy hat’ So once I get in and catch up to the guy, I say thanks and ask him his name.

    It’s Gavin DeGraw (http://www.gavindegraw.com) (I knew he looked familiar!)

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